Workshop Program and Abstracts

III IAA LATIN AMERICAN CUBESAT WORKSHOP

3-7 December 2018

Ubatuba, Brazil

Organization and Institutional Support


Organizing Committee

General chairs

Chantal Cappelletti, PhD, University of Nottingham, IAA

Eduardo Augusto Bezerra, PhD, UFSC

Program chair

Eduardo Augusto Bezerra, PhD, UFSC

Leonardo Slongo, Dr., SENAI-SC

Local arrangements

Cândido Osvaldo de Moura

Carlos Alves

Technical Support

Nataliia Kuriacha and Vladimir Taftay, Brasilia


Scientific Committee

Anna Guerman, Universidade Beira Interior, Portugal

Benjamin K. Malphrus, Morehead State University, USA

Carlos A. Gurgel Veras, Brazilian Space Agency (AEB), Brazil

Chantal Cappelletti, University of Nottingham,UK

Cristiano Fiorilo de Melo, UFMG, Brazil

David Klumpar, Montana State University, USA

Eber Huanca Cayo, Universidad Catolica San Pablo, Peru

Ediz Cetin, Macquarie University, Australia

Eduardo Augusto Bezerra, UFSC, Brazil

Fernando Aguado Agelet, Universidad de Vigo, Spain

Filippo Graziani, IAA/GAUSS, Italy

Geilson Loureiro, INPE, Brazil

Hank Voss, Taylor University, NearSpace Launch, USA

James Cutler, University of Michigan, USA

James Spann­, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, USA

Jean Michel Contant, IAA, France

Jordi Puig-Suari, Cal Poly, USA

Kleber Vieira de Paiva, UFSC, Brazil

Livio Gratton, Colomb Institute (CONAE­-UNSAM), Argentina

Luigi Dilillo, CNRS / LIRMM, France

Luis Zea, University of Colorado, Guatemala

Mengu Cho, Kyushu Institute of Technology - Kyutech, Japan

Mike Swartout, St. Louis University, USA

Mikhail Ovchinnikov, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Russia

Rainer Sandau, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Germany

Renato Alves Borges, UnB, Brazil

Riccardo Bevilacqua, University of Florida, USA

Robert J. Twiggs, Morehead State University, USA

Ronnie Nader, Ecuadorian Civilian Space Agency (EXA), Ecuador

Shinichi Nakasuka, University of Tokyo, Japan

Simone Battistini, UnB, Brazil

Vladislav Solovey, Kosmotras/GAUSS, Russia

Walter Abrahão dos Santos, INPE, Brazil


Welcome message

Following up its successful 2014 and 2016 editions held in Brasilia and Florianopolis, respectively, the 3rd IAA-LACW will keep the focus on topics related to CubeSat technology, providing a forum for scientists and engineers to discuss their achievements and cutting edge findings. Considering the increasing interest in CubeSat activities, and the recent successful CubeSat missions in Latin America, the International Academy of Astronautics is organizing in 2018 a workshop where participants from industry and academia will have the opportunity to share their professional knowledge, enlarging their networks in the subject. Some of the most outstanding professionals in CubeSat missions and applications will attend the workshop giving special talks and lectures.

The city of Ubatuba, located in the state of Sao Paulo, is a trend summer destination. With a population of around 90,000 people, the city is known for having a very high quality of life.

Ubatuba is a home to the Ubatuba-Sat initiative. During the symposium, the temperature is expected to be in the range between 25 °C and 35 °C (77 F and 95 F).

The organizing committee would like to thank everyone for the time spent, and for the volunteering, which made possible to achieve this third edition of the workshop.

Ubatuba, 3rd December 2018.

Chantal Cappelletti

Eduardo Augusto Bezerra


WORKSHOP PROGRAM

AND ABSTRACTS EDITION

Chantal Cappelletti

Eduardo Augusto Bezerra

Monday, 3rd December 2018

07:00-                        Registration

        Lobby – Ubatuba Theatre (Teatro Municipal de Ubatuba)

---Tutorials---

(Chair Mr. Ramon Mayor - IFSC)

Frade room 07:30-12:00

07:30-08:30                Tutorial 1

                        “An Introduction to SDR and GNU Radio

                        Ramon Mayor, IFSC

08:30-10:00                Tutorial 2

                        “Amateur Radio and Space Communications

                         Edson W. Pereira, PY2SDR

10:00-10:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

10:30-12:00                Tutorial 3

                        “A Short Introduction to CubeSats and their Systems Engineering

                        Walter Abrahão dos Santos, INPE

12:00-14:00        Lunch

Monday, 3rd December 2018

14:00-14:25                Opening ceremony

        Auditorium

---Keynotes---

(Chair Dr. Eduardo Augusto Bezerra - UFSC)

Auditorium 14:25-16:00

14:25-14:30                “Introduction to the 3rd IAA Latin American CubeSat Workshop”, Organizing Committee

14:30-15:15                Keynote – “International Academy of Astronautics and CubeSat activities

                        Dr. Chantal Cappelletti, IAA Member, UK

15:15-16:00        Keynote – “An overview of CubeSats and opportunities for Latin America

                        Dr. Rodrigo Leonardi, Directorate of Satellites, Applications and Development, Brazilian Space Agency, Brazil

16:00-16:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

Session 1 – Assembly, Integration, Test and Verification

(Chair Dr. Chantal Cappelletti - University of Nottingham)

Auditorium 16:30-17:45

16:30-16:45        IAA-BR-18-01-01

ENABLING DEEP-SPACE CUBESAT MISSIONS THROUGH STATE-OF-THE-ART RADIATION-HARDENED TECHNOLOGIES

(Lucas Matana Luza, Cezar Antônio Rigo, Elder Dominghini Tramontin, Victor Martins, Sara Vega Martínez, Leonardo Kessler Slongo, Laio Oriel Seman, Luigi Dilillo and Eduardo Bezerra)

16:45-17:00        IAA-BR-18-01-02

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GEOMAGNETIC FIELD SIMULATOR FOR SMALL SATELLITES

(Eber Huanca, Patricio Arapa and Josue Contreras)

17:00-17:15        IAA-BR-18-01-03

HIGH-LEVEL DEVELOPMENTS IN SPACE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING OF THE RAIOSAT PROJECT

(Graziela Fernanda de Souza Maia, Elaine De Souza Ferreira de Paula, Mateus de Oliveira Pereira, Lazaro A. P. Camargo, Kleber Pinheiro Naccarato and Walter Abrahão Dos Santos)

Monday, 3rd December 2018

17:15-17:30        IAA-BR-18-01-04

FLORIPASAT-I: ONGOING INTEGRATION AND TEST STRATEGIES

(Sara Vega Martinez, Edemar Morsch Filho, Leonardo Kessler Slongo and Eduardo Augusto Bezerra)

17:30-17:45        IAA-BR-18-01-05

PROJECT AND VALIDATION OF A MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATOR FOR MECSE CUBESAT UNDER CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT

(Paulo Ferreira, Anna Guerman, António Espírito Santo, Paulo Figueiredo and André João)

20:00                        Welcome Cocktail Reception

        Brava room

Tuesday, 4th December 2018

08:00-                        Registration

        Lobby – Ubatuba Theatre (Teatro Municipal de Ubatuba)

---Keynotes---

(Chair Dr. Livio Gratton - Colomb Institute, CONAE­-UNSAM)

Auditorium 08:30-10:00

08:30-09:15                Keynote – “NanoStar project

                        Dr. Anna Guerman, Universidade da Beira Interior, Portugal

09:15-10:00        Keynote – “NASA's Lunar IceCube - Engineering Challenges with the First Generation of Interplanetary CubeSats

                        Dr. Benjamin K. Malphrus, Morehead State University, USA

10:00-10:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room


Tuesday, 4th December 2018

---Panel---

(Chair Dr. Rodrigo Leonardi - AEB)

Auditorium 10:30-12:00

10:30-10:40                “The SERPENS-II mission”, Dr. Leonardo Slongo, UFSC

10:40-10:50                “Mission status at UnB”, Dr. Giancarlo Santilli, UnB

10:50-11:00                “Mission status at UFMG”, Dr. Maria Cecilia Pereira, UFMG

11:00-11:10                “Mission status at UFSM”, Dr. Marcelo Serrano Zanetti, UFSM

11:10-11:20                “Mission status at UFABC”, Dr. Antonio Gil Brum, UFABC

11:20-11:30                “Payload X and FloripaSat”, Dr. Leonardo Slongo, UFSC

11:30-11:50                “Samanaú Platform: affordable data collecting with satellite transmission”, Mr. Moisés Souto, IFRN, and Dr. Manoel Carvalho, INPE

11:50-12:00                Questions and Answers

12:00-14:00        Lunch

---Keynote---

(Chair Ms. Marcia Alvarenga dos Santos - INPE)

Auditorium 14:00-14:30

14:00-14:30                Keynote – “The international legal regime relating to space activities and space small objects

                        Ms. Tatiana Ribeiro Viana, Sapienza University of Rome

Session 2 – Regulations and Space Law

(Chair Ms. Tatiana Ribeiro Viana, Sapienza University of Rome)

Auditorium 14:30-15:00

14:30-14:45        IAA-BR-18-02-01

ITAR AND EAR - HOW THE DEVELOPMENT OF CUBESATS IS HELPING LATIN AMERICA TO OVERCOME THESE BARRIERS

(Rodrigo Pereira, Marcelo Berejuck and Eduardo Bezerra)

14:45-15:00        IAA-BR-18-02-02

FIVE REASONS WHY CUBESATS DESERVE MORE ATTENTION: LAW AND SCIENCE OVERVIEW

(Marcia Alvarenga dos Santos, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza, and Olavo de Oliveira Bittencourt Neto)

Tuesday, 4th December 2018

---Roundtable---

(Chair Dr. Benjamin K. Malphrus - Morehead State University)

Auditorium 15:00-16:00

15:00-15:10                “Amateur Radio and Space Communications

                        Edson W. Pereira, PY2SD

15:10-15:20                “Space debris mitigation measures (sustainability of CubeSat systems)”

                        Marcia Alvarenga dos Santos, INPE

15:20-15:30                “The space governance of small satellites

                        Tatiana Ribeiro Viana, Sapienza University of Rome

15:30-16:00                Questions and Answers

16:00-16:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

Session 3 – Educational Mission Management

(Chair Dr. Maria Cecilia Pereira de Faria - UFMG)

Auditorium 16:30-17:30

16:30-16:45        IAA-BR-18-03-01

Cor-E SAT

(Martin Ezequiel Molina, Federico Collado, Hernan Adrian Paez, Talia Bessone, Alejandro Muzio and Marco Alvarez Reyna)

16:45-17:00        IAA-BR-18-03-02

ARANDU, AN ENGINEERING PROJECT APPLIED TO HIGH SCHOOL

(Felipe Carvalho, Cláudia Celestino, Leandro Baroni, Mirtes Junior, Tiago Brito and Mariana Xavier)

17:00-17:15        IAA-BR-18-03-03

CTEE – AN APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SPACE ENGINEERING PRACTICES WITH NANOSATELLITES IN BRAZIL

(Jeanne S S Lima, Eduardo Bürguer, Lazaro A. Pires Camargo, Italo Pinto Rodrigues, Daniel Nono, Mateus Oliveira, Auro Tikami, Walter Abrahão Dos Santos, Christopher S. Cerqueira, Herbi J. P. Moreira, Felipe O. Tavares, Plínio I. G. Tenório and Jenny C. R. Asencio)

17:15-17:30        IAA-BR-18-03-04

xCoreLab: LABORATORY OF SIMULATION AND CONTROL OF AEROSPACE SYSTEMS

(Renato Alves Borges, Simone Battistini, Chantal Cappelletti, Rodrigo Cardoso da Silva, Fernando Cardoso Guimares, Marina Andrade Lucena Holanda, Letícia Câmara Van der Ploeg, and Lukas Lorenz de Andrade)

Tuesday, 4th December 2018

Session 4 – Telecommunications, Tracking and Command

(Chair Dr. Fernando Aguado-Agelet, University of Vigo)

Auditorium 17:30-18:00

17:30-17:45        IAA-BR-18-04-01

SatNOGS: TOWARDS A MODERN, CROWD SOURCED AND OPEN NETWORK OF GROUND STATIONS

(Matthaios Papamatthaiou, Ilias Daradimos, Manolis Surligas, Pierros Papadeas, Agisilaos Zisimatos, George Vardakis, Fredy Damkalis, Vasilis Tsiligiannis, Nestoras Sdoukos, Kostis Triantafillakis and Nikos Karamolegkos)

17:45-18:00        IAA-BR-18-04-02

ADDRESSING SMALL SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS ISSUES

(Daniel Oltrogge, Haroon Rashid and Gabriel Yamato)

20:00                        Gala Dinner

        Ubatuba Palace Hotel

Wednesday, 5th December 2018

08:00-                        Registration

        Lobby – Ubatuba Theatre (Teatro Municipal de Ubatuba)

---Keynotes---

(Chair Dr. Maria Cecilia Pereira de Faria - UFMG)

Auditorium 08:30-10:00

08:30-09:15                Keynote – “LUME-1 Satellite: integration of a Cubesat communication satellite in FIRE-RS, a wildland fire characterisation and mapping system of systems

                        Dr. Fernando Aguado Agelet, University of Vigo, Spain

09:15-10:00        Keynote – “On the Shoulders of Giants: Some comments on how Galileo, Kepler and Newton, reduced complex and non-intuitive orbital dynamics realities, into such a simple form, that today we can take them for granted

                        Dr. Livio Gratton, Colomb Institute (CONAE­-UNSAM), Argentina

10:00-10:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

Wednesday, 5th December 2018

Session 5 – On Board Systems and Space Environment

(Chair Dr. Mikhail Ovchinnikov, KIAM, Russia)

Auditorium 10:30-11:45

10:30-10:45        IAA-BR-18-05-01

SPACE PROJECT OF RUSSIAN - AZERBAIJAN SMALL SATELLITE FOR RADIATION MONITORING AND UPPER ATMOSPHERE CONTROL

(Vladislav Osedlo, Michael Panasyuk, Parviz Abdullaev, Vitaliy Bogomolov, Anatoliy Iyudin, Ruslan Gasanov, Vladimir Kalegaev, Tarlan Mammadzada, Vasiliy Petrov, Michael Podzolko, Elena Popova, Rovshan Rustamov, Adalyat Samedov, Hikmat Seyidov, Sergey Svertilov and Ivan Yashin)

10:45-11:00        IAA-BR-18-05-02

THE EFFECT OF SPACE WEATHER ON PICOSATELLITES VIA NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS: THE POLAR WIND

(Jessica Luz, Rodrigo Miranda, Alisson Louly, and Sarah da Costa)

11:00-11:15        IAA-BR-18-05-03

NEW PAYLOADS IN SCIENCE FOR NEW PERSPECTIVES IN UNIVERSITY SATELLITES

(Jorge Arturo Heraud, Sayda Mujica, Rafael Vilchez, Neils Vilchez, Cesar Celis, Carlos Busquets, Alvaro Bueno, Cesar Vilcherrez and Adriano Li)

11:15-11:30        IAA-BR-18-05-04

USE OF NANOSATS AND CUBESATS FOR MONITORING OF SPACE RADIATION AND ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSIENTS IN THE MULTI-SATELLITE PROJECT UNIVERSAT–SOKRAT

(Sergey Svertilov, Michael Panasyuk, Vitaliy Bogomolov, Garik Karymovich Garipov, Anatoliy Iyudin, Vladimir Kalegaev, Pavel Klimov, Vladislav Osedlo, Vasiliy Petrov, Elena Popova, Michael Podzolko, Ilia Rubinstein, Vladimir Ivanovich Tulupov and Ivan Yashin)

11:30-11:45        IAA-BR-18-05-05

SIMULATION OF CUBESATS IN ORBIT: PATH AND COLLISION RISKS

(Victoria Junqueira Gentil, Rafael Andreotti, Mateus Yuji Vieira and David Richard de Noronha Santos)

12:00-14:00        Lunch

---Keynote---

(Chair Dr. Rodrigo Leonardi - AEB)

Auditorium 14:00-14:45

14:00-14:45                Keynote – “High-resolution CubeSat remote sensing for defence applications

                        Dr. Volodymyr Taftai, Ukraine

Wednesday, 5th December 2018

Session 6 – Structure and Thermal Design

(Chair Dr. Anna Guerman, Universidade da Beira Interior)

Auditorium 14:45-16:00

14:45-15:00        IAA-BR-18-06-01

3U GENERIC PLATFORM FOR UNIVERSITY PURPOSES

(João Paulo Resende Monteiro, Maria Cecilia Pereira and Marcelo Greco)

15:00-15:15        IAA-BR-18-06-02

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MAXIMIZATION WITH FOCUS ON HEAT TRANSFER CONTROL OF BATTERIES IN NANOSATELLITES

(Edemar Morsch Filho, Sara Vega Martinez, Leonardo Kessler Slongo, Eduardo Augusto Bezerra, Talita Sauter Possamai, and Vicente Paulo Nicolau)

15:15-15:30        IAA-BR-18-06-03

ADAPTATION OF LOW-COST OPEN SOURCE DESKTOP 3D-PRINTER FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING OF HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOPLASTIC FOR SPACE APPLICATION

(Cristian Vendittozzi, Manuel Barcelos, Paolo Gessini, Giancarlo Santilli, and Ramon Bevilacqua)

15:30-15:45        IAA-BR-18-06-04

ENERGY POTENTIAL EVALUATION OF A THERMOELECTRIC HARVESTING MODULE IN CUBESATS

(Thiago Martins, Andre Ostrufka, Alessandro Cezario De Borba, Guilherme Lenfers Dornelles, Anderson Wedderhoff Spengler, Jorge Luiz Goes Oliveira and Kleber Vieira de Paiva)

15:45-16:00        IAA-BR-18-06-05

ANALYSIS OF HEAT PIPES FOR THERMAL CONTROL IN NANOSATELLITES

(Félix dal Pont Michels Junior and Kleber Vieira de Paiva)

16:00-16:30        Coffee-break

Brava room

---Meeting---

(Chair Dr. Chantal Cappelletti - IAA WG 4.17)

IAA Working Group 4.17 - Space Systems for Biomedical Research

Auditorium 16:30-18:00


Thursday, 6th December 2018

08:00-                        Registration

        Lobby – Ubatuba Theatre (Teatro Municipal de Ubatuba)

---Keynotes---

(Chair Dr. Renato Alves Borges - UnB)

Auditorium 08:30-10:00

08:30-09:15                Keynote – “The Nanosatc-br Program; its genesis, pioneering, results and consequences

                        Dr. Otávio Durão, INPE, Brazil

09:15-10:00        Keynote – “Invention, sensing, simulation and testing of the attitude and orbital motion control for Cubesats

                        Dr. Mikhail Ovchinnikov, KIAM, Russia

10:00-10:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

Session 7 – Mission Applications

(Chair Dr. Otávio Durão - INPE)

Auditorium 10:30-11:45

10:30-10:45        IAA-BR-18-07-01

CUBESAT APPLICATIONS FOR MOVING OBJECTS TRACKING AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

(Hsin-Chia Lin)

10:45-11:00        IAA-BR-18-07-02

SAIL SAILS MISSION 

(José Wagner Garcia, Otavio Durão, José Sergio de Almeida and Valdemir Carrara)

11:00-11:15        IAA-BR-18-07-03

BiomeSat: A PROPOSAL FOR FOREST HEALTH ESTIMATION IN BRAZIL USING NANOSATS

(Manoel Cardoso, Kleber Naccarato, Ronan Chagas, Candido Moura, Luiz Aragão and Walter A. Dos Santos)

11:15-11:30        IAA-BR-18-07-04

OPEN SOURCE AND OPEN HARDWARE POCKETQUBE SUBSYSTEMS

(Ilias Daradimos, Manolis Surligas, Matthaios Papamathaiou, Agisilaos Zissimatos and Pierros Papadeas)

11:30-11:45        IAA-BR-18-07-05

SATELLITE DEPLOYMENT FROM JAPANESE “KIBO” MODULE ON THE ISS

(Masa Nagasaki)

12:00-14:00        Lunch

Thursday, 6th December 2018

Session 8 – Attitude Determination and Control Systems

(Chair Dr. Mikhail Ovchinnikov - KIAM)

Auditorium 14:00-16:00

14:00-14:15        IAA-BR-18-08-01

DETERMINATION OF CUBESAT’S DECAY IMPLEMENTING PERIODIC VARYING BALLISTIC COEFFICIENT

(Jhonathan Murcia Piñeros, Walter dos Santos, and Antonio Prado)

14:15-14:30        IAA-BR-18-08-02

EMBEDDED STAR CATALOG FOR AUTONOMOUS STAR TRACKERS

(Karoline Carvalho Bürger, Pedro Shinzato Camelo, Gabriel Pacianotto Gouveia, and Fabio de Oliveira Fialho)

14:30-14:45        IAA-BR-18-08-03

ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM STUDY FOR A UNIVERSITY CUBESAT DEDICATED TO MEASUREMENT OF THE EARTH'S MAGNETIC FIELD

(Cauê Garcia Menegaldo, Fábio de Oliveira Fialho, Eduardo Janot Pacheco, and Felipe Miguel Pait)

14:45-15:00        IAA-BR-18-08-04

NAVIGATION SYSTEM SIMULATOR FOR SMALL SATELLITES

(Eduardo Lacerda Campos, Samaherni Morais Dias, and Kurios Iuri Pinheiro de Melo Queiroz)

15:00-15:15        IAA-BR-18-08-05

HIL TESTING OF THE B-DOT ATTITUDE CONTROL LAW

(Igor Seiiti Kinoshita Ishioka, Lucas Meneses Bandeira Da Silva, Renato Alves Borges, Simone Battistini, Chantal Cappelletti, Dmitry Roldugin, and Mikhail Ovchinnikov)

15:15-15:30        IAA-BR-18-08-06

SMALLSAT HIGH-ENERGY MISSIONS USING ABLATIVE PULSED PLASMA THRUSTERS

(Paolo Gessini, Rodrigo Intini Marques, Pedro Luiz Kaled da Cás, Cristian Vendittozzi, Giancarlo Santilli, Gabriela Cunha Possa, José Leonardo Ferreira, Lui Txai Calvoso Habl and Stephen Bernard Gabriel)

15:30-15:45        IAA-BR-18-08-07

DEVELOPMENT, LABORATORY TESTS AND FLIGHT RESULTS OF THE TNS-0 #2 NANOSATELLITE MISSION

(Mikhail Ovchinnikov, Danil Ivanov, and Oleg Pantsyrnyi)

15:45-16:00        IAA-BR-18-08-08

APPLICATION OF THE SDRE TECHNIQUE BASED ON JAVA IN A CUBESAT ATTITUDE AND ORBIT CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

(Alessandro Gerlinger Romero and Luiz Carlos Gadelha de Souza)

16:00-16:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

Thursday, 6th December 2018

Session 9 – CubeSat Competitions

(Chair Dr. Walter Abrahão dos Santos - INPE)

Auditorium 16:30-17:00

16:30-16:45        IAA-BR-18-09-01

CubeDesign: A COMPREHENSIVE COMPETITION FOR SPACE ENGINEERING CAPACITY BUILDING IN LATIN AMERICA

(Walter Abrahão dos Santos, Jenny C. Robledo Asencio, Eduardo Burger, Lazaro A. Pires Camargo, Christopher S. Cerqueira, Jeanne Lima, Herbi J. Pereira Moreira, Daniel Nono, Mateus Oliveira, Italo Pinto Rodrigues, Felipe Oliveira Tavares, Auro Tikami and Plinio Ivo Gama Tenório)

16:45-17:00        IAA-BR-18-09-02

OrbiSat-1: EDUCATIONAL MODEL OF A CONCEPTUAL CUBESAT

(Marcos Gonçalves, Gustavo Franco, Rafael Pereira, João Coutinho, Rodrygo Simões, Vinicius Duarte, Arnaldo Marchesotti, and Barbara Germano)

---Meeting---

(Chair Dr. Walter Abrahão dos Santos - INPE)

(Chair Dr. Lazaro Camargo - INPE)

CubeDesign Meeting

Auditorium 17:00-17:30

17:00-17:05                PUC-MG

17:05-17:10                UFSCar-USPSC

17:10-17:15                FACENS

17:15-17:20                UFSC

17:20-17:30          Questions and Answers


Thursday, 6th December 2018

---Poster Session - oral presentations---

Exhibition in the Brava room during the whole workshop

(Chair Dr. Walter Abrahão dos Santos - INPE)

Auditorium 17:30-18:30

17:30-17:35        IAA-BR-18-1P-01

ON BOARD COMPUTING FOR SCIENTIFIC PAYLOADS ON NANOSATELLITES

(Lazaro Camargo and Walter A. Dos Santos)

17:35-17:40        IAA-BR-18-1P-02

LISTENING TO THE EARTH AND CHATTING WITH AMATEUR RADIO FROM SPACE. CDA – A CUBESAT TRANSPONDER

(Vanderlei Cunha Parro, Rodrigo de Marca França, Marcio Antonio Mathias, Alessandro de Oliveira Santos, Rodrigo Alvite Romano, Bahha Laifi, Fernando de Almeida Martins and Sergio Ribeiro Augusto)

17:40-17:45        IAA-BR-18-1P-03

IMPLEMENTATION OF FAULT TOLERANCE TECHNIQUES FOR INTEGRATED NETWORK INTERFACES

(Douglas Melo, Cesar Zeferino, Antonio Ramos, Luigi Dilillo and Eduardo Bezerra)

17:45-17:50        IAA-BR-18-1P-04

DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST APPLICATION FOR OPEN HARDWARE IN SMALL SATELLITES

(Roberto Ferro, Jorge Espindola and Helmer Muñoz)

17:50-17:55        IAA-BR-18-1P-05

DATA ACQUISITION FROM CUBESAT - FACENS³

(Maurício Jandir Daneluz Bonato, Aliffy Eustaquio de Araujo Benevides, Beatriz Cristina Marques de Mendonça and Mariana Mayumi Kawachi)

17:55-18:00        IAA-BR-18-1P-06

IMPACT OF SPACE WEATHER ON THE CBERS SATELLITE THROUGH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

(Alisson Louly, Rodrigo Miranda, Jhessica Luz and Sarah da Costa)

18:00-18:05        IAA-BR-18-1P-07

EXPERIMENTING WITH NANOSATS AND PICOSATS FOR CAPACITY BUILDING IN BRAZIL

(Lazaro A. P. Camargo, Jenny C. R. Asencio, Eduardo E. Burger, Christopher S. Cerqueira, Jeanne Lima, Herbi J. P. Moreira, Daniel Nono, Mateus Oliveira, Italo P. Rodrigues, Felipe O. Tavares, Auro Tikami, Plinio I.G. Tenório and Walter A. dos Santos)

18:05-18:10        IAA-BR-18-1P-08

MONITORING BURNED AREAS IN THE AMAZON FOREST FROM TIME SERIES SATELLITE DATA

(Giancarlo Santilli, Cristian Vendittozzi, Paolo Gessini, Claudia Arantes Silva and Luiz Rocha de Carvalho)

18:10-18:15        IAA-BR-18-1P-09

MODELING AND CONSTRUCTION CANSAT

(Michelly Guedes, Árisla Soares, Pedro Gil, João Nascimento and José Lopes)

18:15-18:20        IAA-BR-18-1P-10

CEFAST AEROSPACE: DEVELOPING CANSAT AND CUBESAT FOR SPACE EDUCATION

(Geraldo Magela Couto Oliveira, Jeferson Figueiredo Chaves, Maria Cecília Pereira and Willer Gomes dos Santos)

Friday, 7th December 2018

08:00-                        Registration

        Lobby – Ubatuba Theatre (Teatro Municipal de Ubatuba)

09:00-09:25                Workshop wrap-up and next edition (candidatures)

                        Organizing committee

09:25-09:30                Closing remarks

                        Organizing committee

10:00-10:30                Coffee-break

        Brava room

10:30                        Transfer to INPE

13:00-14:30                Lunch at INPE

15:00-17:00                LIT/INPE visit - São José dos Campos, SP


ABSTRACTS


ON BOARD SOFTWARE FOR SCIENTIFIC PAYLOADS ON NANOSATELLITES

Lázaro Camargo, INPE

Walter Abrahão, INPE

Nanosatellites are being used to carry out missions originally designed for large satellites due to advances in computing and nanotechnology. In this context, INPE is interested in migrating some scientific experiments that were originally planned for microsatellites into platforms based on nanossatélites and allowing in-situ measurements. This work aims at providing a on-board computing solution to support prospective payloads from CEA-INPE (Coordination of Space Sciences).

On-Board Computer, Nanosatellites, Embedded Systems, Space Science, Payload

CUBESAT APPLICATIONS FOR MOVING OBJECTS TRACKING AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

Hsin-Chia Lin, NSPO

C.J. Fong, NSPO

W.C. Lu, NFU

Randson Huang, CTARL

This paper describes CubeSat programs in Taiwan. One 2U CubeSat is to track the airplanes and UAV. One 1.5U CubeSat is to track the ships and cars. These CubeSats form a constellation for environment monitoring, and tracking of marine and terrestrial vehicles for safety.

Use satellites and ground stations to globally collect the environmental monitoring messages all over the world via the Automatic Identification System (AIS) on the water, Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) on the land, and the Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system in the air.

CubeSat, APRS, AIS, ADS-B, Environmental Monitoring


LISTENING TO THE EARTH AND CHATTING WITH AMATEUR RADIO FROM SPACE. CDA A CUBESAT TRANSPONDER

V.C.Parro, IMT

R.M.França, IMT

M.A.Mathias, IMT

A.O.Santos, IMT

R.A.Romano, IMT

Bahaa Laifi, IMT

F.A Martins, IMT

S.R.Augusto, IMT

The CDA project started in 2013 to develop a CubeSat from scratch in order to share this conception with the scientific community. Besides the mechanical parts, three developed modules were tested as engineering models: an on board processor, a power system based on solar energy and a radio-communication subsystem. All modules are based on commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) components. Two CAN interfaces (one of them for redundancy) enables the data exchange between the modules. The on board processor is composed of 4 ARM processors operating in redundancy. The radio-communication module has two subsystems: a 401MHz link based on QPSK modulation, and the 144MHz transceiver implemented in an ARM-based dedicated architecture. Both of them using the GNU radio platform with the software defined radio concept (SDR). The proposed satellite’s mission is to receive information through the 401MHz link and relay it to the 144MHz link. The main goal of this proposal is to increase the chance of mission success as there are several sensors emitting signals in the indicated frequency range. In addition, the transceiver operates in the amateur radio band, which allows interested people to listen to the data streamed by the CDA nano satellite. At the same time, authorized users are able to send commands to the CubeSat. Currently, the operating system and the mission application software are under development. These steps are expected to be concluded in June 2019. The acronym CDA is an homage to the Brazilian poet Carlos Drummond de Andrade.

Cubesat, Transponder, Embedded System


3U GENERIC PLATFORM FOR UNIVERSITY PURPOSES

João Paulo Resende Monteiro, UFMG

Maria Cecilia Pereira, UFMG

Marcelo Greco, UFMG

The CubeSat initiative began as an educational tool for Aerospace Engineering students and, although this kind of technology has proven itself to be a reliable way of achieving complex missions, it still has an important role as a manner of training and educating human resources. In this sense, and with the objective of developing Aerospace Engineering courses in Brazil, including Federal University of Minas Gerais, the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB) has launched, in 2015, the Serpens (Sistema Espacial para Realização de Pesquisas e Experimentos com Nanossatélites) program in order to promote a learning tool in universities by means of an educational consortium. The first mission of the program, Serpens I, was a 3U satellite launched and operated successfully in 2015. The second mission, Serpens II, followed this mission, being in pre-design phase. It will consist of a scientific research CubeSat 3U and it is under coordination of Federal University of Santa Catarina. Thus, it is expected to maintain such a pattern for future satellites in the program. To accomplish a mission, several subsystems of a satellite must be designed, developed and tested. One of such subsystems is the structural one, and its design consists of the dimensioning of the parts that will support the loads to which the satellite will be subjected, both during launch and operation. It is a critical and vital part of the project, and it must guarantee that none of the other CubeSat components will develop any type of damage and allow the integration of other subsystems, but it is also important to fulfill some desirable characteristics, as accessible cost and low weight, for instance. In this work, we propose a 3U structure in accordance to the requirements for surviving launching and operation loads, the low orbit space environment, as well as offer reasonable cost and constructive ease. All simulation tests were performed following the CubeSat initiative requirements. The design process was made using Finite Elements Method (FEM) simulations and regarded static, dynamic, modal and buckling analyses. The result is an open design for a 3U platform to be used mainly in University programs.

No Keywords


PROJECT AND VALIDATION OF A MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATOR FOR MECSE CUBESAT UNDER CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT

Paulo Ferreira, UBI

Anna Guerman, UBI

António Espı́rito Santo, UBI

Paulo Figueiredo, CEiiA

André João, CEiiA

This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the payload for MECSE CubeSat mission currently under development in Portugal by a joint team of the University of Beira Interior and CEiiA. The mission’s goal is to perform several measurements of the plasma layer’s properties around a 3U CubeSat and to manipulate these properties generating a static magnetic field on board. In order to manipulate the plasma layer, a numerical and experimental study is performed to examine the behaviour of the magnetic field (B), as function of the distance from the magnetic field generator to the spacecraft surface. The strength of the magnetic field decreases as it moves away from the surface of the model, converging to a neutral state equal to zero. The FEMM 4.2 open source software is used to create a model of an axisymmetric generator that provides 0.0375 Tesla at a distance of 25mm from the generator surface; the optimized configuration is selected to reduce the power demand. In the design phase, materials with high permeability for the core (Pure Iron) and with high conductivity for the winding (Copper Wire) are considered. The number of turns and current determine the intensity of the magnetic field. Analysis of the construction and design parameters, allows one to determine the final mass of the generator, matching the MECSE CubeSat Experiment mass requirements (3U under 4 kg, 1U payload). Afterwards, the laboratory model is built and the magnetic field is measured in different locations in order to validate the analytical model of the generator mass determination and FEMM 4.2 software for magnetic constraints. Finally, this paper discusses the possibility to manipulate the plasma layer by creating a robust magnetic field generator capable to fit in one unit of the 3Us MECSE CubeSat.

Atmospheric Re-entry, Plasma Manipulation, Re-entry communication Blackout, CubeSat Mission, Magnetic Field Manipulation


ENABLING DEEP-SPACE CUBESAT MISSIONS THROUGH STATE-OF-THE-ART RADIATION-HARDENED TECHNOLOGIES

Lucas M. Luza, UFSC

Cezar A. Rigo, UFSC

Elder D. Tramontin, UFSC

Victor Martins, ESA

Sara Vega Martínez, UFSC

Leonardo K. Slongo, UFSC

Laio O. Seman, UTFPR

Luigi Dilillo, UM

Eduardo A. Bezerra, UFSC

This work presents a radiation-hardened reconfigurable hardware based platform to be used in deep-space cubesat missions. The platform has been designed for the in-orbit validation of two new technologies: a new radiation-hardened Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) developed in France; and a CCSDS/ECSS IP Core for telemetry (TM) and telecommand (TC) designed at UFSC, Brazil. The printed circuit board (PCB) was designed following the European Space Agency (ESA) space product standards. It has a layered structure that mitigates the effects of radiation and electromagnetic interference on the components signals. All signal layers lie between power and ground planes, avoiding tracks on the outer layers. In addition, all components were selected to tolerate wide temperature variation and some even tolerate radiation – as the microcontroller (MCU) (MSP430FR6989) with ferroelectric program memory and the rad-hard FPGA (NX1H35S-BG625PR). An important architecture feature is to allow changing the hardware configuration of the FPGA through remote uplink of its Bitstream. The MCU is responsible for updating the configuration bitstream stored in a flash non-volatile memory. An aditional bitstream is also stored in the memory, as a fail-safe technique. There are three bitstream copies stored, and a voting scheme is used to ensure the data integrity, as the flash memory is susceptible to Single Event Effects (SEE). The MCU module is responsible for the housekeeping and update management of the rad-hard FPGA. The implementation stored in the FPGA includes not only the TC/TM IP core, but also an abstract execution graph, in the form of a state machine, emulating the basic functionalities of an on-board computer (OBC). The communications module handles TC and TM data and it is an interface between the radio transceiver and the emulated OBC. The emulated OBC is based on the ECSS Telemetry & Telecommand Packet Utilization Standard (PUS), and it performs the validation of the routed telecommand received, and the packaging of the telemetry data acquired by the available sensors. The proposed architecture allows testing all the implementations, exercising its functionalities, and also the module’s integration as a payload of the FloripaSat mission.

Keywords, Separated, By Commas, And Ended, By Periods.

APPLICATION OF THE SDRE TECHNIQUE BASED ON JAVA IN A CUBESAT ATTITUDE AND ORBIT CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

Alessandro Gerlinger Romero, INPE

Luiz Carlos Gadelha de Souza, UFABC

In 2013, the STRaND (University of Surrey and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd) and the PhoneSat (NASA) programs attracted attention of the aerospace community applying commercial off-the-shelf smartphones in CubeSats. Both programs deployed CubeSats using smartphones based on Google’s Android, in which application development is mainly based on Java programming language. Some of these CubeSats had actuators, e.g., STRaND-1 had three reaction wheels mounted in an orthogonal configuration to provide three-axis control, whereas PhoneSat 2.0 beta had magnetorquers to de-tumble the spacecraft. Taking into account a CubeSat that runs Android operating system (based on a smartphone), it is natural to evaluate the attitude and orbit control subsystem (AOCS) based on Java. Moreover, such AOCS can be designed with success by linear control theory, if the satellite has slow angular motions and small attitude maneuver. However, the linearized models are not able to represent all the perturbations due to the effects of th e nonlinear terms present in the dynamics and in the actuators (e.g., saturation) which can damage the system’s performance. Therefore, it is expected that nonlinear control techniques yield better performance than the linear control techniques, improving the AOCS pointing accuracy. One nonlinear candidate technique for the design of AOCS control law is the State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE). SDRE provides an effective algorithm for synthesizing nonlinear feedback control by allowing nonlinearities in the system states while offering great design flexibility through statedependent weighting matrices. In this paper, we present a simulator and the investigation of a SDRE control law based on attitude errors given by quaternion error. The simulator is based on Java and related open-source software libraries (Hipparchus - linear algebra library, and Orekit - flight dynamics library), therefore, it can run on a variety of platforms - including an Android operating system in a CubeSat - and it has low cost. The Java open-source libraries were extended in order to solve the optimization problem that is the cornerstone of the SDRE method. Two control laws (a linear and a SDRE based) were simulated using a Monte Carlo perturbation model. The Nano satellite Constellation for Environmental Data Collection (CONASAT), a CubeSat from the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE), provided the parameters for the simulations. The initial results of the simulations shown that the SDRE-based controller provides better performance.

CubeSat, SDRE, Nonlinear Control, Attitude, Reaction Wheels

USE OF NANOSATS AND CUBSATS FOR MONITORING OF SPACE RADIATION AND ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSIENTS IN THE MULTI-SATELLITE PROJECT UNIVERSAT-SOCRAT

S.I. Svertilov, MSU

M.I. Panasyuk, MSU

V.V. Bogomolov, MSU

G.G. Garipov, MSU

A.F. Iyudin, MSU

V.V. Kalegaev, MSU

P.A. Klimov, MSU

V.I. Osedlo, MSU

V.L. Petrov, MSU

E.P. Popova, MSU

M.V. Podzolko, MSU

I.A. Rubinstein, MSU

V.I. Tulupov, MSU

I.V. Yashin, MSU

D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University is developing a project Universat-SOCRAT of a system of small satellites for monitoring of the space hazards: ionizing radiation, potentially dangerous objects of natural (asteroids, meteoroids) and artificial (space debris) origin, and electromagnetic transients of Earth’s and space origin. In the minimal version, three satellites should be launched into specially selected orbits. One spacecraft of medium mass (small satellite) should be launched on a low solar-synchronous orbit with a height of about 500-650 km and an inclination of 97-98°. Two other satellites of lower mass (micro satellites) should be launched to elliptical orbits with height of perigee and apogee ~700 and 8000 km and inclination 63.4°, which crosses wide range of magnetic drift shells at different altitudes. Satellites will be equipped with multidirectional spectrometers of energetic protons and electrons. Such orbital configuration provides basically solution of the primary goal, i.e. “real time” monitoring of the fluxes of energetic charged particles in the wide range of Earth’s radiation belts. The small satellite, which should be launched to Sun-synchronous low Earth orbit, besides the radiation monitoring also provides observation of space hazards, such as space debris and asteroids and electromagnetic transients. The crucial point in understanding of TGFs physical nature is confirming or refuting their direct connection with the given thunderstorm or lightning. For this goal a good localization of the TGF source is necessary. Localization of TGF sources with good accuracy can be achieved by applying the triangulation method for observations of the selected area with different satellites. For this purpose the Universat-SOCRAT multi-satellite mission could be added by some number of CubeSats or other kind of nanosats, which should be launched with the main spacecraft into similar orbit for the joint observations of a given area of the Atmosphere. To realize the triangulation technique sufficiently light X-ray and gamma-ray detectors aimed for the TGF detection only, without spectrometer capabilities, will be used on the CubeSats. By this the necessity of maintaining of given distance between satellites is a separate technical problem. It can be solved by the use of thrusters on nano-satellites.

SMALLSAT HIGH-ENERGY MISSIONS USING ABLATIVE PULSED PLASMA THRUSTERS

Paolo Gessini, UnB

Rodrigo I. Marques, INPE

Pedro L. K. Da Cás, AEB

Cristian Vendittozzi, UnB

Giancarlo Santilli, UnB

Gabriela C. Possa, UnB

José L. Ferreira, UnB

Lui T. C. Habl, UnB

Stephen B. Gabriel, UoS

Ablative Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (APPTs) were the first Electric Propulsion (EP) devices ever to be flown onboard an actual spacecraft, and continue to be used today in missions were simplicity, robustness and scalability to different power levels are dominant requirements. Therefore, they find a natural niche of application in SmallSat missions, where mass, volume and onboard power are at a premium, in spite of their low overall efficiency and not fully understood physical operating principles. Works by many authors have reviewed and analyzed APPTs, yielding formulas that can be used for preliminary design purposes. Such relations take the general form of power laws with coefficients depending, mainly, on the thruster configuration and, to some extent, on the range of discharge energy values. Whereas in previous papers new correlations of experimental data were proposed with focus on small, low-power applications, now special attention is given to high-energy devices. These will be useful for the design of high-efficiency APPT propulsion systems, which are going to find wide application in the growing market of micro and nanosatellites for increasingly ambitious missions. In fact, while APPTs have drawn renewed attention from the international space community after a long hiatus, this has been generally limited, until now, to low V, low total impulse missions. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of performing high-energy (a shorthand for high v, high total impulse) missions, such as orbit raising or even deep-space missions, for example LEO (Low Earth Orbit)-to-LLO (Low Lunar Orbit) transfer, using APPTs onboard small spacecraft. The design of such missions is far from trivial, as the high specific impulse values that seem desirable to obtain a high payload ratio are generally obtained at the expense of impulse bit (the impulse produced at each pulse) vs discharge energy. This implies a high number of shots, which could strain the capacitor capabilities, or high values of discharge energy, which would increase capacitor weight and, due to power limitations onboard a small spacecraft, imply low firing frequencies and consequently increased mission times. This type of missions with APPT-propelled small spacecraft have been, until recently, outside of the realm of possibilities, because of the weight of the capacitors that would be needed. With recently developed supercapacitors, currently in the process of space qualification, they now become possible, due to highly improved energy densities. This opens a wealth of applications, including ambitious missions on string budgets, as those generally available in academic institutions and developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary study of a potential use of an APPT as a simple and robust primary propulsion system for such low-budget high-energy missions. Scaling laws based on data available in the literature were employed. As APPTs in the kJ-energy level, as the one being proposed here, were never actually tested, though, a deeper analysis will be necessary before their use can be recommended.

                          

Electric Propulsion, Ablative Pulsed Plasma Thruster, Small Satellite, CubeSat, High-Energy Missions

IMPLEMENTATION OF FAULT TOLERANCE TECHNIQUES FOR INTEGRATED NETWORK INTERFACES

Douglas Melo, UFSC

Cesar Zeferino, UNIVALI

Antonio Ramos, USN

Luigi Dilillo, LIRMM

Eduardo Bezerra, UFSC

                          

The increasing demand for safety and mission-critical computational systems to operate in hostile environments, along with the component miniaturization for such systems, have triggered the need for developing fault tolerance techniques to mitigate the incidence of system failures and increase reliability. Communication architectures used in computers for aerospace applications are made up of a growing number of processing cores. Some approaches that are proposed in the literature do not meet the communication requirements of future on-board computers composed of multiple cores. Networks-on-Chip are the successors of the bus for multicore interconnection, integrating cores by the means of Network Interfaces. This work discusses the implementation and evaluates the performance of the Hamming encoding, the Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR), and temporal redundancy into the eXtensible Interface for Routing Unit (XIRU) Network Interface. Five scenarios are considered based on the combination of these techniques. Results show that the TMR in FIFO buffers is the most costly technique in terms of area usage, the Hamming code has the highest power dissipation, while the temporal redundancy has the lower operation frequency. Finally, a modified version of XIRU to integrate cores into Network-on-Chip systems with reliability requirements is devised. We intend to use the interface to integrate the cores of future cubesats developed in the FloripaSat project.

Networks-on-Chip, Network Interface, Fault Tolerance

INVENTION, SENSING, SIMULATION AND TESTING OF THE ATTITUDE AND ORBITAL MOTION CONTROL FOR CUBESATS

Mikhail Ovchinnikov, KIAM

Along with a mathematical simulation of the attitude and translational motion the test benches for verification of math models and control algorithms were developed and used. The advantage of Cubesat for laboratory testing is its small size and mass so that it can be tested itself even without scaling. Evolution of test bench from elementary to advanced one with reference to missions where the facility was used for is presented.

Attitude Control, Translational Motion Control, Laboratory Simulation

DEVELOPMENT, LABORATORY TESTS AND FLIGHT RESULTS  OF THE TNS-0 #2 NANOSATELLITE MISSION

Mikhail Ovchinnikov, RAS

Danil Ivanov, RAS

Oleg Pantsyrnyi, JSC

The flight results of the Technological NanoSatellite TNS-0 #2 is presented in the paper. The main feature of the TNS-0 nanosatellite series is to use the GlobalStar communication system. The details on the communication sessions are given in the paper. The main purpose of the nanosatellite TNS-0 № 2 is to obtain the flight qualification of the instruments and sensors installed onboard. The results of the attitude motion determination using magnetometer and sun sensors data during the mission are presented in the paper. Using the measurements of GPS/GLONASS receiver the TNS-0 #2 orbit degradation in the dense layers of the atmosphere is tracked.

Passive Magnetic Attitude Control, Flight Data Processing, Orbit Degradation


SPACE PROJECT OF RUSSIAN–AZERBAIJAN SMALL SATELLITE FOR RADIATION MONITORING AND UPPER ATMOSPHERE CONTROL

V.I. Osedlo, MSU

M.I. Panasyuk, MSU

P. Abdullaev, CAA

V.V.Bogomolov, MSU

A.F.Iyudin, MSU

R. Gasanov, CAA

V.V. Kalegaev, MSU

T. Mammadzada, AZERCOSMOS

V.L. Petrov, MSU

M.V.Podzolko, MSU

E.P. Popova, MSU

R. Rustamov, AZERCOSMOS

A.S. Samedov, CAA

H. Seyidov, CAA

S.I. Svertilov, MSU

 I.V. Yashin, MSU

The small satellite space experiment is elaborated jointly by M.V.Lomonosov State University and National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan. Small satellites are applicable for the study of different physical phenomena, such as transient electromagnetic events, i.e. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF), Transient Luminous Events (TLE) and space Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB), as well as magnetosphere electron precipitation, which can be dangerous for the spacecraft and biological objects. The sun synchronous orbit with relatively low altitude (500 - 800 km) provides the favorable conditions for the control of upper atmosphere and the study of the space radiation in different areas of the near-Earth space, including areas of trapped radiation and regions of electron precipitation from the radiation belts.  

This project assumes the elaboration of a general scientific concept of satellite experiment, determination of the optimal orbits and orientation of the spacecraft, determination of parameters and technical appearance of measuring instruments (spectrometers of energetic protons and electrons), requirements for satellite platform, orientation system, data transmission and data processing. The data, which is planned to be obtained during this experiment, will be subsequently used for the scientific and applied tasks, such as the study of the processes of acceleration and loss of trapped and quasi-trapped energetically charged particles in the Earth magnetosphere, validation of existing and development of new dynamic models of Earth radiation belts, support and confirmation of the safety of space vehicles.  

The additional task is the analysis of the possibility of including of Russian-Azerbaijan satellite in the Universat-SOCRAT multi-satellite group, which is also currently elaborated in the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. This gives a good opportunity for the additional measurements of energetically charged particle fluxes, as well as for the detection of electromagnetic transients, Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) at different points of the near-Earth space. The last is very useful for the TGF source localization by the triangulation technique.

Small Satellite, Monitoring, Radiation, Upper Atmosphere

Cor-E Sat

Federico Collado, UTN

Ezequiel Molina, UTN

In this opportunity we present the next evolution of the work shown at Open Source CubeSat Workshop 2017 & 2018 edition. The design stage has been completed and we are going forward to the production and testing phase of the project thanks to all the support received from CONAE and UTN-FRC.

We developed a low-cost CubeSat kit prototype system 80 percent less priced than commercial version, capable of replicate the same functionality of an actual CubeSat, made up with accessible components to be included in any university or high school institution. The aim is to attract and train undergraduate students towards aerospace technology missions and science. Incite the small-satellites paradigm growing worldwide. Based mainly on Open-Source hardware. To foster the approach between the academic field and the space environment.  

We approach the possibility to develop subsystem, interfaces and application to fill a regional vacancy area. We believe in the open space by making easier and possible the academic field.

Connecting us with local and regional institutions interested in CubeSat standard-based technology for a hands-on training using the developed Kit CubeSat, 3D printing & COTS model prototype.

The Arduino platform was chosen for the first implementation because its low cost, local availability and work philosophy. This project include:

Space Segment: On board Computer, a camera module as Payload, digital Accelerometer, light sensor and pressure & temperature sensor for ADCS. Up/Down Link RF module, solar Panels and EPS subsystem.

Ground segment simulates a real Ground Station, it is composed by a reception module antenna with Nano Arduino or an SDR ground station option.

As a complement to the developed kit, the next step is to generate a simulator of space conditions to perform material performance tests with aspirations to develop a low-cost flight model available for the academic area of the region.

CubeSat, Educative, 3D Printing, COTS

DETERMINATION OF CUBESAT´S DECAY IMPLEMENTING PERIODIC VARYING BALLISTIC COEFFICIENT

Jhonathan O. Murcia Piñeros, INPE

Walter Abrahão dos Santos, INPE

Antônio F.B.D.A. Prado, INPE

It is estimated that more than 18,500 objects are in orbit around the Earth, with a total mass above 7,500,000 kg. These numbers consider only objects with dimensions larger than 10 cm, with most of them non-operational and without control (debris). The space debris represent a hazard to operational satellites and space operations. Recently, the development of CubeSats missions has increased the number of objects in the Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and, due to the low operational time, the CubeSats increases rapidly the debris population. One of the requirements for space debris mitigation in LEO is limiting the orbital lifetime to lower than 25 years. However, there are space debris with a larger estimated decay time. In LEO´s, the influence of the atmosphere is more significant than the solar radiation pressure and the third body perturbations, generating losses of the orbital energy and accelerating the decay. To determine the orbital decay, different tools are implemented, but most of them use analytical solutions, which reduce the computational time and the accuracy of the results. The goal of the present research is to study the influence of a rotational maneuver, which generates variations in the ballistic coefficient along the trajectory, to mitigate orbital debris. A panel method in hypersonic rarefied flow is implemented to determine the Drag and ballistic coefficients as functions of the CubeSat attitude and rotation. The mathematical model takes into account the gravitational potential in the order 50x50 and the acceleration due to Drag. A numerical integrator RKF 7/8 with a tolerance of 1E-15 is selected to solve the equations of motion. The Gravitational Model selected for the Earth is the EGM-08 with the wind model HWM-93. More than 2,500 trajectories were simulated. The initial perigees selected were lower than 450 km of altitude and the eccentricities lower than 0.2. The results show differences of around five months in the decay between CubeSats with an angular velocity of 1 Hz and CubeSats without rotation. It is observed that the differences are of the order of months for configurations of 2U and 3U with eccentricities higher than 0.1. To reduce the error in the atmospheric density, it was compared the atmospheric model NRLMSISE-00 with results from 1U CubeSat’s historical Two Line Elements (TLEs). The trajectories simulated show a residual error below 1.5% during four days of propagation, which indicates that the observed data are in agreement with the orbital propagations. The results show that the difference of decay increase proportionally to the perigee altitude and eccentricity.

CubeSat, Space Debris Mitigation, Orbit Propagation, Orbit Decay, Aerodynamic Drag, Satellite Lifetime.

ADDRESSING SMALL SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS ISSUES

Daniel L. Oltrogge, CSSI

Haroon Rashid, AGI

Gabriel L. Yamato, ANACOM

Small satellites are becoming the top choice for many types of industries, offering homogeneity across a constellation, low cost of implementation, backup redundancy, and multiple simultaneous launches. Yet major communications issues confront the small satellite community and it is important to address the approaches to this problem.

Communications is the principal element needed to manage the satellite network, control the satellites, monitor the health of the space systems, and recover strategic mission data. Low Earth Orbit small satellites are agile and highly dynamic, moving at up to 8 kilometers per second. This alters satellite-to-satellite and satellite-to-ground geometries, causing continuous fluctuations in antenna orientation and gain, propagation environmental loss and noise, transmission delays, and Doppler frequency shifts. In addition, the small satellite size imposes constraints on the antenna size and gain, the RF power, and the satellite attitude. Considering current developments in space laser communications, RF and laser links may be mixed within a single constellation.

Dynamic communications link budget analyses are required to ensure reliable operations of these systems. Simplistic spreadsheet Link Budget tools fail to capture the highly dynamic nature of these communications systems. We will discuss methods for analyzing link budget in various levels of fidelity to match your design and operational needs. We also will present ways to visualize dynamic analytical satellite communications results in 2D and 3D.

An often-overlooked aspect of satellite communications is “keeping track custody” of the satellite, which generally means maintaining good positional knowledge of each spacecraft so that you can schedule activities, reacquire and command it as desired and ensure intra-satellite communications links. We will explain tracking data and sources, timeline for tracking, value of GPS, trackability enchantments, cross-tags, 18SPCS, SSA Data Sharing Agreement and telemetry ground station placement.

Insights into the FCC’s current applications process for small satellites using Part 5 and Part 97 will also be shared through the lens of the conditional approval of the SpaceX constellation as a recent example of the FCC’s Part 25 application process.

Dynamic Link Budget, Small Satellite, Communications, FCC


EMBEDDED STAR CATALOG FOR AUTONOMOUS STAR TRACKERS

Karoline Carvalho Bürger, USP

Pedro Shinzato Camelo, USP

 Gabriel Pacianotto Gouveia, USP

Fábio de Oliveira Fialho, USP

Star trackers are key sensors for any state-of-the-art CubeSat’s Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS). They are the most accurate attitude sensors commercially available off-the-shelf. Nevertheless, their accuracy is still far from those about 1 arcsec rms at boresight axes available for bigger satellites. Better accurate star trackers for CubeSats depends not only on their optics design but also on their detector technology and onboard data processing. This last one requires an embedded star catalog for precise field recognition and line of sight determination. In this context, this article aims at presenting a tool to compute such a catalog. It is based on the highly accurate astrometric data obtained by the GAIA space mission. The tool’s graphical user interface allows users to compute embedded catalogs given any set of camera parameters. New algorithms are still being implemented and in the near future, it will become a powerful tool for predicting achievable accuracy on the whole celestial sphere according to any selected camera design and mission profile.

Aerospace Engineering, Attitude Determination and Control System, Star Trackers, Embedded Catalog

ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM STUDY FOR AN UNIVERSITY CUBESAT DEDICATED TO MEASUREMENT OF THE EARTH’S MAGNETIC FIELD

Cauê Garcia Menegaldo, USP

Fábio de Oliveira Fialho, USP

Eduardo Janot Pacheco, USP

Felipe Miguel Pait, USP

The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a weakness in the Earth’s magnetic field. Characterizing it has impact on technological and research programs. The Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences (IAG) of the University of Sao Paulo (USP) is working on the development of a 1U CubeSat dedicated to its measurement. The Polytechnic School of the USP (EPUSP) is responsible for the CubeSat’s Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) development. This paper covers the Attitude Control System (ACS) assessment studies that have been carried out so far at EPUSP. It covers the satellite dynamic simulator development, the detumbling controller as well as a Nadir direction pointing controller. The result is an ACS capable of reducing the CubeSat angular velocity after launch from 10 deg s−1 to 0.1 deg s−1 in 0.6 orbits and a Nadir reference tracking with 5 degrees of axial error in Euler angles.

CubeSats, Attitude Control System, Dynamic Modeling, Earth’s Magnetic Field, South Atlantic Anomaly

ADAPTATION OF LOW-COST DESKTOP 3D-PRINTER FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING OF HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOPLASTIC FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS

Cristian Vendittozzi, UnB

Manuel N. D. Barcelos Jr., UnB

Paolo Gessini, UnB

Giancarlo Santilli, UnB

Ramon C. Bevilacqua, UnB

Space industry requires construction materials that are light in weight, have excellent physical and thermal characteristics, and reduce the hazard to passengers and crew in the event of a fire. This imposes restrictions on flammability, smoke generation and the evolution of toxic by-products, for all manned missions, including those to the International Space Station and touristic sub-orbital trips. Polymers present an enormous variety of significant properties, such as toughness, resilience, low density, high and low melting points, ability to be molded and electrical resistivity. Moreover, they can be easily nano-structured and nano-filled to further improve the aforementioned characteristics in a targeted manner, allowing their use in a wide range of spacecraft applications (thermal blankets, thermal control paints, adhesives, lubricants, paints, circuit boards and insulating coatings). Polymers suffer from a much faster deterioration of physical characteristics than other materials due to the space environment. Thus, to date, a polymer could hardly be used to produce a structural component such as a CubeSat Spacecraft BUS panel, especially for external use. Exterior spacecraft materials are exposed to many space environmental threats that can damage spacecrafts and their operation. In low Earth orbit (LEO) these threats include: solar radiation (ultraviolet, UV and x-rays), solar wind particle radiation (electrons, protons), extreme temperatures and thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (space particles), atomic oxygen (reactive oxygen atoms). Polyether-ether-ketone, known with the commercial name of PEEK™, has increasingly been used in the aerospace industry as a replacement for metal components, because it combines all the characteristics of light alloys with the easy processability typical of polymers. Indeed, PEEK is produced as well by additive manufacturing (AM), by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using high-cost professional equipment, capable of achieving and maintaining the temperatures required for PEEK production cycle and allowing the manufacture of geometrical complex parts, reducing material excess, typical advantages of AM technologies. The aim of this research work is demonstrating the opportunity of adapting a lowcost desktop FDM 3D-printer to the PEEK printing requirements, allowing the manufacture of spacecraft parts with a low-cost equipment, highlighting the reproduced properties of the PEEK and the contribution to lower production costs and standardization that are fundamentals features of the CubeSat philosophy. Furthermore, material and manufacturing technology indicated in the paper would allow in-space manufacturing process of components with properties suited to space applications and performance comparable with those of light alloys, in the most cost effective and efficient possible way. The paper presents the state of the art of the conversion/adaptation of a desktop low-cost 3D printer for the production of PEEK by FDM, carried out at the UnB-Gama faculty.

Additive Manufacturing, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), PEEK, Space Applications, Smart Materials

DATA ACQUISITION FROM CUBESAT – FACENS³

Aliffy E. De A. Benevides, FACENS

Beatriz C. M. De Mendonça, FACENS

Mariana M. Kawachi, FACENS

Maurício J. D. Bonato, FACENS

During the cubesat development, the use of several kind of sensors was planned both for monitoring the satellite's internal conditions and for the acquisition of external data that are usually the satellite's mission. This paper  focus in developing the use of this sensors and processing the data obtained.

The accelerometer with the gyrometer were planned to work as the navigation system of the satellite, from obtaining the angular velocity and acceleration until determining the angular position by the Kalman filter. It will be also the approach for the main problems in using these sensors, possible solutions and alternative location systems.

The satellite's on board control system, as temperature measurement, battery level and consumption, and solar arrays performance, will be showing how sensing was proposed to work, the imprecision of the techniques being used and how these problems can be solved.

It will be exposed about the light detection using the photodetector. The goal of this part is to explain about the light detector system used in this research, how and why it has been shown inefficiently for the mission proposed. Also, it will be developed an alternative sensing and data processing system with the accelerometer and gyrometer data on the Kalman filter for an even more precise approach of the location.

Ending the sensing part, it will be cited about image obtaining and the uses of the camera, and  how the data manipulation could be done.

Finally, during the data processing, it will be focused on the use of Kalman filter, as the main subject of this paper. The Kalman filter is a technique that consists in capturing data from a model in the system analyzed and the sensors used in the cubesat, adjusting the previewed data with the measured ones for an even more precise approach to the correct data. This paper will expose the process steps, which consist in the calculation of previewed estate matrix and previewed covariance matrix, sensors data obtaining, Kalman’s gain calculation and the calculation of the new estate and the covariance matrix. It will be approached the application of this technique on the attitude control in the spaceship systems.

Cubesat, Satellites, Sensoring, Kalman.


SIMULATION OF CUBESATS IN ORBIT: PATH AND COLLISION RISKS

David Santos, FACENS

Mateus Vieira, FACENS

Rafael Andreotti, FACENS

Victoria Gentil, FACENS

Cubesats are small satellites which plays a very important role in a modern civilization, performing a wide variety of activities like communication, meteorology, internet, location and general monitoring. However, CubeSats have a lifespan and after that become a space debris or turn back into the atmosphere, depending on the height they are in.

Nowadays earth orbit has a high concentration of space debris, which can affect active satellites, besides it can forbid future launch of new satellites during next years. Although a lot of researches seeks solution for this theme, it is necessary to emphasize that simulations can make your path without any collisions happen during its cycle, can reduce the problem, after all spatial collisions increase the number of debris and that really make some concerns in view of the projection from Kessler's syndrome.

Based on that, this work seeks to study and model the movement dynamics and kinetic, by classic mechanical of rigid body to simulate the CubeSat in orbit around its gravity center and consider the probabilities of some collision happen during the route.  

This work uses MatLab platform together with S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S database, simulating the calculation of guidance and graphics representations of it allowing to simulate a dynamic through a three-dimensional drawing among coordinates of a CubeSat and its probability to collide with another satellite or even with any other object.

In order to schematize this situation, it is necessary a deep study about Euler Angles and Quaternions as well, to define the Attitude Control, in other words, a more evident dynamic of its behavior over time.

 Cubesat, Space Debris, Kessler’s Syndrome, Orbit, Inertial Frame of Reference


DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GEOMAGNETIC FIELD SIMULATOR FOR SMALL SATELLITES

Eber H. Cayo, UCSP

Josue P. Contreras, UCSP

Patricio R. Arapa, UCSP

The present work depicts the design and implementation of a geomagnetic field (earth magnetic field) simulator, which is constituted by a mechanical structure (three pairs of coils of a square Helmholtz cage), an electronic system (feedback push pull current amplifier and instrumentation constituted by a network of magnetometers) and a computational system (command, control and monitoring of magnetic field). This device allows to replicate the geomagnetic field variation according the orbit which a cubesat could to pass. In consequence, this device also could to assist and complement the simulation and validation of attitude determination and control systems for cubesat prototypes.

Helmholtz Cage, Structure, Feedback Amplifier, Magnetometer, CubeSat

ARANDU, AN ENGINEERING PROJECT APPLIED TO HIGH SCHOOL

Felipe V. de Carvalho, UFABC

Claudia Celeste Celestino, UFABC

Leandro Baroni, UFABC

Mirtes Ribeiro Junior, UFABC

Tiago Porto Brito, UFABC

Mariana Fernandes Xavier, UFABC

ARANDU is a project created in 2016 with the objective of inserting high school students in Engineering, more specifically, Aerospace Engineering. After an admission process, students from the public high school system are given a course inside the university which the objective is to learn some of the basic steps included in a CanSat construction. During the course, they have classes ministered by university’s students as monitors, on subjects as electronics, programming, materials properties, 3D modeling and even project management. The main goal of ARANDU is to insert the perspective of a higher level education into public system student’s life, as many of them tend not to keep on with their education after finishing the high school in Brazil. We do this by inserting them into academic environment and introducing them to practical topics of Engineering, closing the gap between high school and university. In it’s third year of experience, the project has evolved enough to the point that it’s structure can be used as a platform to produce a high school level course in any subject, giving a tool for those committed with encouraging high school students to seek a degree in any field of knowledge. The project also benefits the monitors, who put to practice concepts learned during their program as an engineering project. They also are responsible for studying, reviewing and refining the topics related to the course in order to produce high quality material so they can properly transmit the knowledge to the students. In this paper we will show ARANDU’s historic and the methodology behind how aerospace engineering topics can be adapted to high school student’s level. Will also be shown the project’s CanSat, it’s capabilities and some performed tests.

Aerospace Engineering, ARANDU, CanSat, Public High School

CUBEDESIGN: A COMPREHENSIVE COMPETITION FOR SPACE ENGINEERING CAPACITY BUILDING IN LATIN AMERICA

Walter A. Dos Santos, INPE

Jenny C. R. Asencio, INPE

Eduardo E. Burger, INPE

Lazaro A. P. Camargo, INPE

Christopher S. Cerqueira, ITA

Jeanne Lima, INPE

Herbi J. P. Moreira, INPE

Daniel Nono, INPE

Mateus Oliveira, INPE

Italo P. Rodrigues, INPE

Felipe O. Tavares, INPE

Auro Tikami, INPE

Plinio I. G. Tenório, INPE

 

This paper presents the general and comprehensive approach used to the organization and project dynamics of a space engineering capacity building competition, named CubeDesign, initially targeted to Latin America. It is well known that space activities contribute positively to the general economy status of countries with an active space program. Latin America in general is looking for its locus in the space arena and ramping up efforts to improve its current space programs. This is quite important since these activities compels engineering skills and competencies for realizing the Industry 4.0 paradigm which is extensively based on automation, big data, artificial intelligence, 3D printing, etc., and that LA countries needs so much. The CubeDesign competition concept emerged with the inception of INPE´s Space Engineering and Technology post-graduate CTEE students group aiming at hands-on space missions, future workforce developments and promoting various outreach activities such as cubesat workshops for the public in general. The 1st CubeDesign edition has three categories, namely: mockups, cansats and nanosats and is engaging participants from all schooling levels. In mockups, participants are asked to build them and later run minimal strength tests in its structure so that the assembly can be certified. The cansat category requires a fully functional device structured so that teams can evaluate their design performance and subject to a short flying and fall event demanding survival of the cansat for a message transmission. The last category consists of a 1to-3U cubesat where teams need to undergo functional testing of their attitude control subsystem for image acquisition and pass through environmental tests such as thermal cycling and random vibration and yet perform satisfactorily for mission conclusion. Its first edition took place in mid-2018 in Brazil and its 2nd edition in 2019 will be a bigger competition accepting members from all Latin-America.

Nanosatellite, Cubesats, Public Outreach, Capacity Building

THE SAIL SAILS ART SPACE MISSION

José W. Garcia, NOOSFERA

Otavio S. C. Durão, INPE

José S. de Almeida, INPE

Valdemir Carrara, ITA

The Sail Sails ("Avelaleva" in Portuguese) is an art space mission. As such is the first one of this type in Latin America. It is an idea from José Wagner Garcia who is an experienced artist using space with his experiment operated by the brazilian astronaut, Marcos Pontes, in the International Space Station - ISS in his Centennial mission in 2006. The mission combines art and advanced technology as it will use a very small satellite, of the type "cubesat", with 10x20x30 cm. dimensions.

The art is accomplished by the sunlight reflected in the satellite so that people on Earth can see it at naked eye. However, for that, a lot of advanced technology has to be incorporated in the satellite. The reflectance is achieved with the use of a "mirror" composed of a very thin material, that unfolds with the satellite already in space. The technology attractiveness of this   design is that it can also be used as a propulsion sail to cubesats, making it achieve orbits that would not be possible to achieve without a propulsion system in the cubesat. The solar wind "blows" the sail as the wind does with a boat in the sea. This is a very new concept to increase capacity of the cubesats. The mission thus has a double purpose. To perform art in space and also to advance the cubesat technology for further applications. The project in the technology aspect has an international cooperation of  cubesats companies interested in solar sail propulsion with brazilian engineers with experience both in larger satellites as well as in specifying, design, develop, launch and operate successful space missions using cubesats. The mission analysis, a key point for both objectives of the mission (angular control of the cubesat, orbit analysis, sun-satellite line of view, mission lifetime, ground operation etc) will also be performed by the space engineering side of the project. Brazil, through its National Institute for Space Research - INPE, has the required infrastructure for testing the cubesat in an unique environment, including a thermal vacuum chamber that can test the opening of the sail, which emulates the space environment in vacuum and varying the temperature as is the case from minus 80 degrees Celsius to over 60 degrees Celsius. This testing capability, emulating the space environment while the sail unfolds, greatly increase the reliability of the mission performance. The launch will be from the International Space Station (ISS) at a 400 km. height. ISS is one of the main cubesat launchers at the present days and probably will increase this participation as, at this height, it doesn´t originate debris in space after the satellite lifetime, since it reentries the Earth atmosphere after a short period.  

"Sail sails" will be operated by existent ground stations for cubesats in Santa Maria, RS and São José dos Campos, SP, owned by INPE. However, as it will operate in VHS/UHF amateur radio frequency, any amateur radio station in the world will be able to get its signal and check its health. But the ultimate Earth stations for the mission will be the people eyes and delight.  

Space Art, Solar Sail, Solar Propulsion, Solar Reflectance

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MAXIMIZATION WITH FOCUS ON HEATER CONTROL OF BATTERIES IN NANOSATELLITES

Edemar M. Filho, UFSC

Sara V. Martinez, UFSC

Leonardo K. Slongo, UFSC

Eduardo A. Bezerra, UFSC

Talita S. Possamai, UFSC

Vicente P. Nicolau, UFSC

Energy availability is one of the most critical constraints in nanosatellite design. The reduced dimensions of spacecraft result in limitations on energy harvesting and energy storing capabilities. Therefore, nanosatellites’ energy management strategies shall be optimized to increase the number of tasks than can be executed. A heating device is usually needed for nanosatellites that pass through eclipse zones, where low temperatures occur. Batteries have a narrow range of operational temperature, usually starting around 0 ºC but in space, however, temperatures may achieve -20 ºC. Heaters are a common solution for active thermal control, whose algorithm is normally based on a fixed temperature set point. This causes high power consumption rates when the satellite is within the eclipse. On the other hand, the execution of high power tasks drop the battery voltage and may compromise an efficient energy distribution. Eventually, these battery voltage variations may also reduce the satellite energy harvesting capability. The Electrical Power System (EPS) operates primary source devices (e.g. photovoltaic cells), generating stable power buses to supply the satellite subsystems. EPS architectures may be listed into two main groups: Direct Energy Transfer (DET) and Peak Power Tracking (PPT). The DET architecture connects the solar panels directly to the batteries. It is the simplest and the safest architecture, but it is strongly dependent on battery voltage condition. Therefore, nanosatellites based on DET and using battery heaters may operate inefficiently. Opposite to conventional control, this work proposes an algorithm that considers the voltage drops caused by the heaters to regulate its operation. Therefore, both battery voltage and temperature measurements of solar panels are taken as algorithm’s inputs. Numerical and analytical tests are conducted to estimate the battery temperature operational range, instead of a single set point temperature. The heater control algorithm is energy driven. It keeps the batteries always within the operational temperature range, but also optimizes the batteries voltage to operate the solar panels as close as possible to their maximum power point. The proposed strategy prioritizes energy management, increasing energy availability.

It results on a more versatile satellite, able to execute greater amount of tasks in orbit.

CubeSat, Electrical Power System, Solar Energy Harvesting, Battery Temperature, Heater.

ENERGY POTENTIAL EVALUATION OF A THERMOELECTRIC HARVESTING MODULE IN CUBESATS

Thiago Martins, UFSC

Andre Ostrufka, UFSC

Alessandro C. De Borba, UFSC

Guilherme L. Dornelles, UFSC

Anderson W. Spengler, UFSC

Jorge L. G. Oliveira, UFSC

Kleber V. De Paiva, UFSC

This work aims to develop a thermoelectric harvesting module that acts as a payload to evaluate the electric energy generation by thermal gradients among faces of a CubeSat 1U. The harvesting module is responsible to convert, manage and store nanosatellite energy. In order to evaluate its energy potential, some different topologies are proposed. The differences are related to charge storage capacitors capacity and the type of DC-DC converter used for each case. The present work seeks to validate the numerical results through applying them in a test bench capable to physically simulate thermal energy generation in nanosatellites faces. This method allows energy conversion and storage through the proposed harvesting module to be realized experimentally. As a result, it is expected to determine the best converter-capacitor set to manage conversion and storage of energy generated by TEGs.

Energy Harvesting, Thermoelectric Energy, Cubesat Payload

THE EFFECT OF SPACE WEATHER ON PICOSATELLITES VIA NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS: THE POLAR WIND

Jhessica Luz, UnB

Rodrigo Miranda, UnB

Alisson Louly, UnB

Sarah da Costa, UnB

The polar wind is a space phenomenon that consists of an outflow of plasma in the polar regions of the terrestrial magnetosphere, due to the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth’s atmosphere. Recently, picosatellites are emerging as an alternative for designing low budget missions for educational purposes, for example, the UbatubaSat project. In this paper, we seek to analyze the effects of the polar wind on the surface of a picosatellite via numerical simulations of a particle-in-cell code. The results obtained through the simulations show accumulation of charge and the occurrence of a current on the surface of the satellite that can lead to localized discharges and significant damages in the satellite. Our study can be useful for future space missions involving smallsats in low-Earth orbit.

Picosatellite, Space Weather, Numerical Simulation

IMPACT OF SPACE WEATHER ON THE CBERS SATELLITE THROUGH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

Alisson Louly, UnB

Rodrigo Miranda, UnB

 Jhessica Luz, UnB

Sarah da Costa, UnB

The space weather can have a great impact on space-based technologies. The present article analyzes the effect of charge accumulation on the surface of the CBERS4 satellite due to the space environment via particle-in-cell numerical simulations. The simulations represent the condition of the polar wind, a region which is an up-flowing stream of ionospheric plasma along the open geomagnetic field lines in the poles. The results show the resulting charge accumulation, charge density and the resulting electrostatic potential on the CBERS-4 surface. The present study demonstrates that the accumulated charge can generate localized discharges and other problems, and may be a starting point for other related studies.

Space weather, CBERS, surface charging

MODELING AND CONSTRUCTION CANSAT  

Michelly Guedes, IFRN

Árilsa Soares, IFRN

 José Lopes, IFRN

João Nascimento, IFRN

The present work materializes itself as a scientific experiment whitch objective is to simulate the systems of a real satellite. The research developed provided knowledge in the areas of modeling, 3D printing, simulation and assembly of electronic circuits as well as the assembly of the cansat prototype as final product. The intended goals of this project consists on the didactic simulation of satellite systems and the scientific experience provided by the satellite production process. For this development, we used the simulation of the electronic circuits in online platforms and modeling of the structure in 3D modeling software, after that the physical assembly of the circuit and the printing of the casing in 3D printer was executed. As a result of this process we obtained the didactic prototype of a cansat with the systems of an actual satellite and with the purpose of capturing climatic variables through sensor systems inserted in its circuit.  

Satellite, Simulation, Modeling And Electronic Circuit.

CTEE – AN APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SPACE ENGINEERING PRACTICES WITH NANOSATELLITES IN BRAZIL

Jeanne S. S. Lima, INPE

Herbi J. P. Moreira, INPE

Eduardo E. Burger, INPE

Italo P. Rodrigues, INPE

Felipe O. Tavares, INPE

Lazaro A. P. Camargo, INPE

Mateus Oliveira, INPE

Auro Tikami, INPE

Plinio I. G. Tenório, INPE

Daniel Nono, INPE

Walter A. Dos Santos, INPE

Christopher S. Cerqueira, ITA

Developing activities that cater for engineering competencies and skills towards an Industry 4.0 paradigm based on automation, big data, artificial intelligence, 3D printing, etc., are a crucial factor for developing countries like Brazil. Usually big satellite projects at INPE take some time and preclude major student involvements, which need to validate their case studies and have a real hands-on experience for a practical yet, fully mission target. In this scenario, this paper presents the CTEE initiative, its best practices, lessons-learned and results from using nanosats for improving and developing space-engineering practices. CTEE stands in Portuguese for “Technological Capacity on Space Engineering” and its inception was at INPE´s Space Engineering and Technology post-graduation. It aims at enabling hands-on space missions for students, build up future workforce developments and promoting various outreach activities in Brazil ranging from teens to post-graduate students. The CTEE group has setup some good practices to support the development of a series of nanosats with increasing complexity and mission capabilities. The first satellite, named Alpha, is 1U cubesat with a simple attitude control followed by Beta, a 2U cubesat with more precise attitude control and lastly, Gamma, a 3U cubesat with an optical mission. The expected period for nanosatellite project is two years with incremental deployments where students can validate their projects, have practical training and develop the various space subsystems. Furthermore, a series of small cubesat workshop events targeting kids and the public in general are presented with innovative approaches to the theme.

Human Resources, Space Education, Nanosatellite, CubeSat

SATELLITE DEPLOYMENT FROM JAPANESE “KIBO” MODULE ON THE ISS

Masa Nagasaki, Space BD

Space BD Inc., a private company based in Tokyo, Japan, provides satellite launch and deployment services through the Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo” on the International Space Station(“ISS”) as the official commercial service provider selected by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(“JAXA”) since May 2018. As many of Latin American CubeSats have been deployed, more than 220 satellites have been deployed from "Kibo" and it has a strong presence in the small satellite launch market. 1U to 6U CubeSat and 50kg-size satellites can be deployed into ISS orbit, an inclination of 51.6 degrees. Space BD offers launch opportunities together with user-friendly service from a private enterprise viewpoint and is providing a full range of services from interface coordination, safety review support, frequency band acquisition, flight integration, transportation, and satellite launch/deployment to reduce user's burdens. Why “Kibo”? Among several advantages of utilizing “Kibo” which includes: gentle vibration environment where the satellites are stowed as “cargo” in cargo transfer soft cushioned bags; flexibility of launch schedule enabled by regular resupply spacecraft missions on a quarterly basis; no debris concern due to deployment from 400km altitude; Space BD would like to emphasize that “Kibo” enables users to get the whole mission experience in the cheapest and quickest manner because of its short project lifecycle. Space BD understands that experience is the key or perhaps the only way to mission success. If you use “Kibo”, you could get three CubeSat project experience in five years. This is also the best fit to educational mission purpose. Furthermore, Space BD offers launch opportunities together with capacity building package in cooperation with experienced Universities in Japan who have received students from foreign countries.

Launch Opportunities, ISS, CubeSat, Capacity Building, Experience

OPEN SOURCE AND OPEN HARDWARE POCKET CUBE SUBSYSTEMS

Ilias C. Daradimos, LSF

Manolis Surligas, LSF

Matthaios Papamathaiou, LSF

Agisilaos Zissimatos, LSF

Pierros Papadeas, LSF

Following CubeSat form factor success, the next miniaturization level, PocketQube format, is getting popular due to its small form factor and reduced cost. Libre Space Foundation, a nonprofit for Open Source and Open Hardware space technologies, is developing a series of PocketQube subsystems based on the PQ9ISH format, a variation of PQ-9 standard to be proposed by TU-Delft.

The PQ9ISH architecture uses CAN Bus for communication among subsystems. CAN Bus was preferred over RS-485 because it addresses both the physical and the data link layer, it has built-in fault tolerance, can manage collisions when multiple devices need to talk all at once and is implemented in the hardware of most micro-controller units. Although the maximum speed of CAN Bus is limited to 1 Mbit/s compared to the 10Mbit/s of RS485, it does outperform the 200 kbit/s found on most MCU UARTs. Additionally having data link layer already implemented in hardware promotes protocol compatibility of systems designed by different entities.

All software and hardware are Open Source, and it is built using only Open Source tool chain.

Testing results of the prototype modules are presented consisting of transmission spectrum analysis, TVAC testing and power consumption. CAN Bus performance is also evaluated in a 1-wire short distance implementation that replaces the CAN driver with a single diode. Although this approach reduces CANs immunity to noise, it does reduce power consumption and allows for a second 1-wire channel to be implemented adding redundancy or performance contributing to the overall system contingency.

Furthermore, two under development subsystems are presented, a generic science/sensor module and the Attitude Determination Module (ADS).

Finally, alternate uses of these systems are proposed since their small form factor of 42x42mm allows integration in high altitude balloons and CANSAT hardware. The low cost of the engineering models of these modules allows educational institutes and schools to provide students interaction with hardware designed for space, a significant advantage over similar educational hardware.

PocketQube, Open Hardware, Open Software, COMMS, CAN Bus

NAVEGATION SYSTEM SIMULATOR FOR SMALL SATELLITE

Eduardo L. Campos, UFRN

Samaherni M. Dias, UFRN

Kurios I.P.M. Queiroz, UFRN

Recently, small satellite have gained a great deal of attention as an alternative solution to space exploration. Although, this new approach can provide a reduced cost and a short development time, the size and mass constraints of small satellite create several difficulties that should be evaluated.

This article presents a toolbox developed to estimate the small satellite attitude and angular velocity. It has been developed for a small satellite equipped with only two sensors, a magnetometer to measure the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field and a solar sensor to measure the direction of the Sun, which are simulated by an ideal model with the addition of white noise.

To estimate the attitude, the developed toolbox has selected the norm-constrained Extended Kalman Filter, which is able to estimate both the spacecraft angular velocity and the quaternion attitude from the selected sensors. Once the Kalman Filter is a discrete time algorithm, that simulator has been developed to emulate the onboard navigation computer, allowing the assessment the behavior of the algorithms within a discrete time system.

To simulate the small satellite, is was considered to have a rigid body and to describe the kinematic equations, quaternion was chosen. Thus, to evaluate the simulated values with the values achieved by the navigation systems, a simulation has been carried out, which provides the results achieved by this toolbox.

Simulation, Navigation System, Quaternion, Kalman Filter, Toolbox

BIOMESAT: A PROPOSAL FOR FOREST HEALTH ESTIMATION IN BRAZIL USING NANOSATS

Manoel F. Cardoso, INPE

Kleber P. Naccarato, INPE

Ronan A. J. Chagas, INPE

 Candido O. de Moura, INPE

Luiz E. O. C. Aragão , INPE

Walter A. Dos Santos, INPE

Conservation of forests in Brazil is important for several reasons. They host an elevated number of plant and animal species, and store and exchange large amounts of water and carbon between the land surface and the atmosphere, thus affecting biodiversity, climate, and the availability of important natural resources. Recently, the country has committed to substantially reduce its atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases as part of international agreements for preventing negative effects of future climate change, in which reduction of deforestation and recovering of degraded areas are incorporated in the planned actions. Due to their broad extension, remote sensing is essential for monitoring forests in Brazil.  

In order to contribute to the ongoing programs for observing forest cover in the country, we plan to provide forest health information using data collected from nanosats, motivated by their lower cost and rapid deploy when compared to larger orbital remote-sensing systems. In specific, we plan to assess forest information based on as vegetation indexes, because they may aggregate the effects of several disturbances, such as drought, deforestation, and fires. Based on previous experience from other projects, we are currently evaluating and planning on the mission specific requirements, including conceptual design needs and compliance of sensors and hardware, and perspective for project funding. Concerning the nanosat approach, this work also analyses the stages of the space mission over the system lifecycle, which consists basically of: (a) mission analysis, (b) life cycle analysis, (c) functional analysis, (d) design architecture analysis and, (e) concept of operations. In addition to low-cost relevant data, we anticipate that this project may bring other potential benefits on capacity building innovation, development of human resources and educational outreach.

Brazilian Forests, Carbon, Conservation, Climate, Nanosatellite

SATNOGS: TOWARDS A MODERN, CROWD SOURCED AND OPEN NETWORK OF GROUND STATIONS

Manolis Surligas, LBS

Matthaios Papamatthaiou, LBS

Ilias Daradimos, LBS

Vasilis Tsiligiannis, LBS

Pierros Papadeas, LBS

Agisilaos Zisimatos, LBS

Fredy Damkalis, LBS

Kostis Triantafillakis, LBS

George Vardakis, LBS

Nestoras Sdoukos, LBS

Nikos Karamolegkos, LBS

Over the last years the launching cost of a payload in space has been significantly reduced and this trend is expected to continue, as the interest for space applications is increasing. The reduced launch cost and the advancements in technology, gave the opportunity to small satellites to revolutionize access to space.

The majority of the small satellites missions are targeting the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Due to the nature of this particular orbit, communication with a satellite is possible only for a few minutes per day for a given location. This raises the need for multiple ground stations in several geographic locations. Although such an infrastructure is possible, most of the times it is both complicated and expensive for research or educational entities to obtain. Given the fact that each ground station exhibits a small per day utilization for a specific satellite, the idle time can be used for reception of other missions.

SatNOGS is an open source software and open hardware project that addresses this problem by interconnecting all participating ground stations, offering their idle time to other users of the SatNOGS network.

Ground Station Network, Ground Station, Open Source, Crowd Source, Software Defined Radio

ITAR AND EAR: HOW THE DEVELOPMENT OF CUBESATS IS HELPING LATIN AMERICA TO OVERCOME THESE BARRIERS

Rodrigo V. M. Pereira, UFSC

Marcelo D. Berejuck, UFSC

Eduardo A. Bezerra, UFSC

Latin American governments have already suffered or are still suffering direct/indirect regulations by ITAR, EAR, such as exemplified by the attempted sale of the Brazilian A-29 aircraft to Venezuela, sanctions for the Mectron MAA-1 Master System and the PGA chip CBERS3 satellite camera. In this way, the CubeSat concept, together with the adoption of ITAR/EAR-Free technologies, has been highlighted as the best approach for labor training, technology creation, insertion and consolidation of Latin America in the exclusive group of countries capable of dominating the development cycle, launch and use of space systems. The region has deviated from these restrictions and has become a major player in the global aerospace industry. The aim of this paper, is to present the results of an investigation about ITAR and EAR regulations in Latin America and what are the impact of these regulations on CubeSats’ projects.

ITAR, EAR, UMSL, CCL, ITAR-Free, EAR-Free

ANALYSIS OF HEAT PIPES FOR THERMAL CONTROL IN NANOSATELLITES

Félix D. P. Michels, UFSC

Kleber V. de Paiva, UFSC

Interest and consequently investment in nanosatellite research and development has grown in recent years. Its low cost and design time are the biggest draws, especially for CubeSats. The main challenge for this class of satellites is energy generation. Such generation is made through photovoltaic panels and their efficiency of converting solar energy into electrical energy is low. The efficiency is affected by the temperature of the cells of the solar plate, that is, the higher the panel temperature, the lower the efficiency. Add to this, the avalible area is retrict in nanosatellites. The present work therefore proposes to evaluate the use of thermal control mechanisms for the dissipation of the heat accumulated in the solar panels coupled in CubeSats, thus keeping them at optimum temperature for electric power generation. The heat exchange mechanism chosen is the heat pipe, mainly because it is a passive control and does not consume electrical energy, thus not change the energy state of a CubeSat. Experiments under real operating conditions for characterization of the heat pipe were made, finding the optimum amount of filling of the heat pipe with working fluid, and finally obtaining the heat resistance of the heat pipe in that state. A simple thermal analytical model was developed using the contributions of radiation from all solar panels and ambient radiations to simulate the space environment. With initial estimates of the temperature in the solar panels and the heat resistance of the heat pipe, it is possible to reach the final temperature of the photovoltaic panels using the heat pipe through the developed analytical model. Thus, calculation of the increase in energy conversion efficiency is done using the initial and final temperatures, as well as the rate of increase of the efficiency of the solar panel per unit of temperature. The results are promising: a minimum increase of 23.43% in efficiency is noted, which would cause an increase in power generation of 0.4 W in only one solar panel. This result testifies that the use of a heat pipe in a CubeSat specially designed would be beneficial.

Heat Pipe, Solar Panel, Nanosatellite, Thermal Model

HIGH-LEVEL DVELOPMENTS IN SPACE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING OF THE RAIOSAT PROJECT

Graziela F. de S. Maia, INPE

Elaine de S. F. de Paula, INPE

Mateus de O. Pereira, INPE

Lazaro A. P. de Camargo, INPE

Kleber P. Naccarato, INPE

Walter A. Dos Santos, INPE

The RaioSat project envisages a 3-U CubeSat proposal by INPE-Brazil in order to detect intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes simultaneously, namely the total lightning detection for regions over Brazil. This information is usefull for predicting extreme weather phenomena which requires high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and high amount of observational data. The RaioSat approach is based on previous bigger satellites projects like FORTE, OTD and LIS which have shown that detection of lightning events from space is feasible and can provided important datasets for lightning research and new space technology development. This project integrates Earth System Sciences research with some space technological development and uses an optical sensor and a VHF antenna onboard a cubeSat platform. This paper briefly covers high-level developments in space systems engineering the RaioSat project, namely: 1) Mission, 2) Life cycle process, 3) Stakeholder Analysis, 4) Requirements, 5) Functions, 6) Systems Architecture and 7) Detailed design. Two different sensor networks that detect and locate lightning flashes in Brazil, called RINDAT and BrasilDAT, will be used as reference data. The RaioSat mission is expected to be in a LEO orbit and it will use a 3U-CubeSat aluminum frame (10x10x30cm) to accommodate the main platform and its payload. The main platform shall have telemetry, commanding and housekeeping capabilities via an on-board computer, 3-axis attitude control and a GPS. The payload shall have a VHF passive antenna (range of 50 to 200MHz) and a spectral imaging camera (SIC) having a spectral range from 700 to 900nm using a band-pass optical filter. The RaioSat project is expected to be then an important starting point for future research and developments in the areas of Earth System Sciences and Space Engineering Technologies at INPE-Brazil. This joint project allows the technical development for remote sensing lightning events and their detection from space. These data can be then assimilated into the NWP models to improve the forecast of extreme weather events, which are one of the major features in climate change.

Total Lightning Detection, Space Systems Engineering, Cubesat

 

NEW PAYLOADS IN SCIENCE FOR NEW PERSPECTIVES IN UNIVERSITY SATELLITES

Jorge Arturo Heraud, PUCP

Sayda Mujica, PUCP

Rafael Vilchez, PUCP

Neils Vilchez, PUCP

Cesar Celis, PUCP

Carlos Busquets, PUCP

Alvaro Bueno, PUCP

Cesar Vilcherrez, PUCP

Adriano Li, PUCP

After launching its first two satellites, PUCP-Sat-1 and Pocket-PUCP (pre-launch named as PUCP-Sat-2), the Institute for Radio Astronomy (INRAS) of the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP), has been moving forward looking for new challenges and opportunities in order to expand its development in the area of small satellites.

For some years now, our Institute has focused on the development and implementation of payloads for small satellites for research in the field of microbiology for studying the effects of space environment on some microorganisms using microtechnology.

This paper presents the implementation of different payloads for experiments in photographing  techniques from orbit, appropriate environments for microbiology experiments in microgravity and on the ground for comparison.

MONITORING BURNED AREAS IN THE AMAZON FOREST FROM TIME SERIES SATELLITE DATA    

Giancarlo Santilli, UnB

Cristian Vendittozzi, UnB

Claudia Arantes Silva, UnB

Paolo Gessini, UnB

Luiz Fernando Rocha de Carvalho, UnB

Actions to reduce deforestation and forest degradation are directly related to global efforts to preserve unique ecosystems of our planet and mitigate climate change. Human action potentiates the climatic effects and is the main cause of the burning events in the Amazon Forest, occurring mainly in areas of deforestation and management of agriculture and pasture. Therefore, land use and cover condition the burning patterns of the Amazon forest, where Conservation Units and Indigenous Lands are important barriers, while sites with intense deforestation, fragmentation and presence of highways present a higher number of fires. Burnings in the Amazon are concentrated along the "deforestation arc," a growing region between the eastern and southern edges of the forest with intensified anthropogenic actions. In the interior of the Amazon, the deforestation arc has lower biomass and drier climates, resulting in larger burnings. The effects of climate change on the Amazon region provide for the expansion of forest fires in the region due to more frequent droughts and intensification of land use. This research aims at evaluating MODIS time series spectral indices for mapping burned areas in some regions of the Para state (Brazil), located in the arc of deforestation, and at assessing their occurrences in the different types of land use/land cover. Among the sensors with high temporal resolution, the MODIS sensor has been prominent in the mapping of fires in the different terrestrial biomes and of burned areas. Several MODIS products have been used in this study. In particular,  thermal anomalies MODIS product (MOD14/MYD14) has been widely used in the study of fires in the Amazon. The analysis of this product in the region of Para state found that the method hit 51.58% of the total areas burned, where most of the undetected areas occur in small areas (average size of 38.74 ha). In addition, the MOD14 product could overestimates the amount of burned areas by mistakenly considering areas of exposed soils, forests and other types of land cover.

Remote Sensing, Amazon Forest, Burned Area, Deforestation, MODIS Time Series

ORBISAT-1:EDUCATIONAL MODEL OF A CONCEPTUAL CUBESAT

 

Marcos Gonçalves, PUCMG

Gustavo Franco, PUCMG

Rafael Pereira, PUCMG

João Coutinho, PUCMG

Rodrygo Simões, PUCMG

Vinicius Duarte, PUCMG

Gustavo Franco, PUCMG

Gustavo Franco, PUCMG

This project aims to propose a simple and cheap alternative for the dissemination of CubeSats and space related topics, by creating a educational kit, through which people from ages 10 to 80 can understand the basics on what is a satellite, how does it work and how to build one. OrbiSat-1 is a conceptual CubeSat developed by the Orbi Engineering team from Minas Gerais, designed to close the gap into the aerospace sector for people starting in this field with little to no knowledge about astronautical engineering. The CubeSat itself is an easy to build and quick to learn project, that uses 3D printing, commercial off the shelf components and easy to learn coding, to simulate some of the key features of a real satellite, while keeping the cost bellow R$250,00 Reais. The kit comes with assembly instructions and the project offers online material, including tutorials, finished codes and contacts from our team, to provide more information and help with the building. It can measure temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity and gather other information about the surrounding environment. It can also emit sounds and blink lights, while receiving and transmitting information and commands through infrared, Bluetooth and radio. The kit can also be treated as a starting point, because of the easy access to Arduino based components, users can implement many other functionalities after they learn the basics. OrbiSat-1 is a model built to develop the national and international interest for the aerospace sector, taking a practical experiment to the public and private educational institutions, at a cheap cost, allowing for a growing demand for space related activities and creating awareness for its impacts and potentials amongst the population.

Educational Kit, CubeSat, Arduino, 3D Printing

EXPERIMENTING WITH NANOSATS AND PICOSATS FOR CAPACITY BUILDING IN BRAZIL  

Lazaro A. P. Camargo, INPE

Jenny C. R. Asencio, INPE

Eduardo E. Burger, INPE

Christopher S. Cerqueira, INPE

Jeanne Lima, INPE

Herbi J. P. Moreira, INPE

Daniel Nono, INPE

Mateus Oliveira, INPE

Italo P. Rodrigues, INPE

Felipe O. Tavares, INPE

Auro Tikami, INPE

Plinio I. G. Tenório, INPE

Walter A. Dos Santos, INPE

The engineering carriers in Brazil are currently facing a serious setback due to the lack of national investments in a state-driven research and development sector deeply affected by instabilities. In countries with an established space sector, its industry segment usually has an amplifying factor in the internal economy. In this scenario, this paper presents some initiatives, best practices, lessons-learned and results using nanosats and picosats for space education and outreach in Brazil ranging from teens to post-graduate students. The first one was the Tancredo-I picosatellite project development and successful launch from the Japanese ISS Kibo module in early 2017 followed by the formation of INPE´s Space Engineering and Technology post-graduate CTEE group which aims at enabling hands-on space missions for students, build up future workforce developments and promoting various outreach activities. The CTEE group has setup some good practices to support the development of a series of nanosats with increasing complexity and mission capabilities. Some measures of critical assessment with very positive results for the Tancredo-I picosatellite in the Brazilian media and web access to project content are quite visible. A series of small cubesat workshop events targeting kids and the public in general are detailed with innovative approaches to the theme. All these activities are looking forward to reach competencies such as on Industry 4.0 driven by automation, big data, artificial intelligence, 3D printing, etc., that rely pretty much on engineering skills which Brazil needs to improve extensively. Future plans include a first time national nanosat competition named CubeDesign which 2018´s edition is taking place and a laboratory dedicated to the development of nanosats, named NanoDevLab, and run by students, INPE staff and its collaborators.

Capacity Building, Nanosatellite, CubeDesign, Cubesats, Public Outreach  

FIVE REASONS WHY CUBESATS DESERVE MORE ATTENTION:  

LAW AND SCIENCE OVERVIEW

M. Alvarenga dos Santos, INPE

M. Lopes de Oliveira e Souza, INPE

O. de Oliveira  Bittencourt Neto, UNISANTOS

The beginning of the Space Age was marked by the launch of Sputnik 1, an 87kg satellite, carrying a single radio transmitter, that, according to most of the literature, would fit into the small (micro) satellites category. As time went by, satellites grew in size and mass, in purpose and complexity. In parallel to this, a series of satellites, named OSCAR, were built and put into orbit by non-State actors. Such space objects are most popular nowadays. The study of the OSCAR series offers understanding on the behavior of small low complexity satellites in the space environment, such as cubesats, into outer space for, at least, five good reasons that will be detailed in this paper.

Space Law, International Environmental Law, Small Satellites, Cubesats.

HIL TESTING OF THE B-DOT ATTITUDE CONTROL LAW

Igor Seiiti Kinoshita Ishioka, UnB

Lucas Meneses Bandeira da Silva, UnB

Renato Alves Borges, UnB

Simone Battistini, UnB

Chantal Cappelletti, UON

Dmitry Roldugin, KIAM

Mikhail Ovchinnikov, KIAM

This paper presents the procedures and results concerning the implementation of the B-dot magnetic attitude controller for nanosatellites in a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulator. The B-dot is a detumbling attitude control law that uses the rate of change to the geomagnetic field sensed by the satellite as a mean to command the magnetic moments generated by the magnetic actuators. In order to reduce the risk related to the Attitude Control System (ACS) in real space missions, it is extremely important to test the system on the ground to evaluate the control performance and to debug any unexpected issues of algorithm implementation. The experiment was conducted through a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) test facility, capable to generate both satellite kinematics and geomagnetic field components through the air bearing testbed and a Helmholtz Cage, respectively. The magnetic torques were generated by the 3axis magnetic actuators attached to a 2U CubeSat mockup. The obtained result is the damping of the angular velocity of the mockup attached to the air bearing system.

Attitude Control System (ACS), Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulator, Bdot controller, detumbling, magnetic actuators

XCORELAB: LABORATORY OF SIMULATION AND CONTROL OF AEROSPACE SYSTEMS

Renato Alves Borges, UnB

Simone Battistini, UnB

Chantal Cappelletti, The University of Nottingham

Rodrigo Cardoso da Silva, UnB

Fernando Cardoso Guimares, UnB

Marina Andrade Lucena Holanda, UnB

Letícia Camara Van der Ploeg, UnB

Lukas Lorenz de Andrade, UnB

This work presents an overview of the xCoreLab activities at the University of Brasilia. The xCoreLab - Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Aerospace Systems - has its core research concerned with control system solutions, applications and innovations in the field of Aerospace Engineering. Currently, the main topics under investigation are divided into three main areas: high altitude scientific platform, nanosatellite OBC and ADCS hardware-in-the-loop simulator and global navigation satellite systems applications. This paper presents the recent contributions, the challenges and the goals for the long run, as well as the current installed capability.

Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), On-Board-Computer (OBC), Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) ADCS simulator, GNSS, High Altitude Scientific Platform.